28 Bastion Square was built in 1889 by architect H.O. Tiedemann as the Supreme Court of British Columbia building.

It was the Provincial Court of British Columbia until February 1962, when the Provincial Court moved to its present location on Courtenay Street at Blanshard Street.

28 Bastion Square as the Maritime Museum, 2005.

28 Bastion Square as the Maritime Museum, 2005.

A Brief History of 28 Bastion Square

28 Bastion Square was built in 1889 by architect H.O. Tiedemann, at an estimated construction cost of 35,075, as the Supreme Court of British Columbia building.

It was the Provincial Court of British Columbia until February 1962, when the Provincial Court moved to its present location on Courtenay Street at Blanshard Street.

In 1901 architect Francis Rattenbury designed additions, which included the installation of an elevator for Chief Justice Theodore Davie, whose doctor had advised him against climbing stairs. The 1901 elevator is still operational.

Francis Rattenbury’s 1901 renovations also included filling in many of the windows. To gain additional office space, Francis Rattenbury converted the main arches on the east portico (facing Langley Street) to windows and the former portico space into offices.

in 1963-64 this building served as Victoria’s temporary City Hall while renovations and additions were underway at Victoria City Hall in Centennial Square.

The Maritime Museum moved into the building in 1965 and stayed until 2014, when the Maritime Museum moved to its current location at 634 Humbolt Street, across from the Empress Hotel.

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