This building at 1900 Store Street, at the intersection of Chatham Street, is best known today as Capital Iron.

Capital Iron at 1900 Store Street. the building was originally built in 1862 for Dickson, Campbell & Company, commission merchants.

Capital Iron at 1900 Store Street. the building was originally built in 1862 for Dickson, Campbell & Company, commission merchants.

1824 Store Street (left), built in 1890, and 1900 Store Street (right), built in 1862.

1824 Store Street (left), built in 1890, and 1900 Store Street (right), built in 1862.

Additional Information About 1900 Store Street

  • Assessed Value (July 2015): $5,034,000; Land $2,834,000 Buildings $2,200,000

A Brief History of 1900 Store Street

Here are links to some historic photos of 1900 Store Street:

This building was originally built in 1862 as a two storey building – one storey at street level with a second storey below opening onto the waterfront – by Dickson, Campbell & Company, Commission Merchants, who used it as an office and warehouse.

In 1885 the building was leased by the Mount Royal Milling & Manufacturing Company, based in Montreal, which operated a rice and flour mill called the Victoria Roller Flour & Rice Mill.

The company imported rice from China and Burma (now Myanmar), transported to Victoria by the famed clipper ship Thermopylae, which was based in Victoria circa 1890 to 1897, when she was sold to the Portuguese navy as a training ship.

Between 1889 and 1891 the Victoria Roller Flour & Rice Mill added the second and third storeys (when viewed from Store Street; when viewed from Victoria Harbour, they would be the third and fourth storeys) to this building.

In 1900, the Victoria Roller Flour & Rice Mill built the adjacent building at 1824 Store Street and operated both 1824 Store Street and 1900 Store Street as rice and flour mills until 1923.

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